Seven Wonders of Canada

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In 2007 CBC did a “Seven Wonders of Canada” competition. They asked viewers to nominate picks and cast votes. Ultimately, the final decision was left to a panel of judges. And they did a terrible job.

Here are CBC’s “Seven Wonders of Canada”:

  • The Canoe
  • The Igloo
  • Niagara Falls
  • Old Quebec
  • Pier 21
  • Prairie Skies
  • The Rockies

The problem with the list is that it doesn’t really follow the spirit of original wonders of the world. It puts too much emphasis on poetic criteria.

The original wonders of the world were manmade structures that inspired awe due to their size, intricate engineering, and status as landmarks.

With that in mind here is an alternative “Seven Wonders of Canada”:

Seven Wonders of Canada

CN Tower

The Canadian National Tower is a symbol for not only Toronto but Canada as a whole. It was the world’s tallest free standing structure at the time of construction in 1976 and remains the tallest in the western hemisphere. The very definition of a landmark, this award winning feat of engineering is visited by over 2 million people annually.

CN Tower

West Edmonton Mall

As the largest shopping mall in North America and the largest in the world until 2004, this temple of commerce has made its mark as a destination for 32 million visitors a year. It contains over 800 stores and houses the second largest indoor amusement park in the world, the second largest indoor waterpark in the world, the largest indoor wave pool, an indoor lagoon with four California sea lions, and a replica of the Santa Maria.

West Edmonton Mall

Rideau Canal

This 202 kilometre waterway was built in 1832 as a defensive measure in case another war broke out with the United States. The Rideau Canal is the oldest continuously operated canal system in North America and connects Kingston to Ottawa using 45 locks at 23 different stations. In the winter the canal transforms into the world’s largest skating rink.

Rideau Canal

Canadian Museum of History

Canada’s national museum of human history is a state of the art preserve for countless relics of Canada’s past. The museum is split into various halls containing such exhibits as the world’s largest indoor display of totem poles, the world’s largest colour photograph, and the world’s oldest hockey stick.

Canadian Museum of History

Chateau Frontenac

Quebec City’s landmark hotel is an iconic piece of Canadian architecture. The Chateau Frontenac played a significant part in history when it hosted the Quebec Conference of 1943. The 18 floor, 600 room resort is the most photographed hotel in the world.

Château Frontenac

Hibernia Gravity Base Structure

Built to work on the Hibernia oilfield south east of Newfoundland, this offshore oil platform is the largest in the world by weight. It was built to survive collisions with icebergs and to support 5800 tonnes of weight on its topside.

Hibernia

Confederation Bridge

The Confederation was finished in 1997 and connected Prince Island Edward with the rest of Canada. The 12.9 km bridge is the largest in Canada and lead to an increase in tourism on the island, drastic growth in the potato industry, and the introduction of large scale retail stores to the island.

Confederation Bridge

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